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1: 6.12 Asymptotic Expansions
When 1 2 π | ph z | < π the remainder term is bounded in magnitude by csc ( | ph z | ) times the first neglected term. For these and other error bounds see Olver (1997b, pp. 109–112) with α = 0 . For re-expansions of the remainder term leading to larger sectors of validity, exponential improvement, and a smooth interpretation of the Stokes phenomenon, see §§2.11(ii)2.11(iv), with p = 1 . …If the expansion is terminated at the n th term, then the remainder term is bounded by 1 + χ ( n + 1 ) times the next term. … The remainder terms are given by …
2: 7.12 Asymptotic Expansions
When | ph z | 1 4 π the remainder terms are bounded in magnitude by the first neglected terms, and have the same sign as these terms when ph z = 0 . When 1 4 π | ph z | < 1 2 π the remainder terms are bounded in magnitude by csc ( 2 | ph z | ) times the first neglected terms. … For re-expansions of the remainder terms leading to larger sectors of validity, exponential improvement, and a smooth interpretation of the Stokes phenomenon, see §§2.11(ii)2.11(iv) and use (7.11.3). … The remainder terms are given by …
7.12.6 R n ( f ) ( z ) = ( - 1 ) n π 2 0 e - π z 2 t / 2 t 2 n - ( 1 / 2 ) t 2 + 1 d t ,
3: 6.16 Mathematical Applications
6.16.2 S n ( x ) = k = 0 n - 1 sin ( ( 2 k + 1 ) x ) 2 k + 1 = 1 2 0 x sin ( 2 n t ) sin t d t = 1 2 Si ( 2 n x ) + R n ( x ) ,
6.16.3 R n ( x ) = 1 2 0 x ( 1 sin t - 1 t ) sin ( 2 n t ) d t .
6.16.4 R n ( x ) = O ( n - 1 ) , n ,
4: 12.9 Asymptotic Expansions for Large Variable
§12.9(ii) Bounds and Re-Expansions for the Remainder Terms
5: 2.11 Remainder Terms; Stokes Phenomenon
§2.11 Remainder Terms; Stokes Phenomenon
When a rigorous bound or reliable estimate for the remainder term is unavailable, it is unsafe to judge the accuracy of an asymptotic expansion merely from the numerical rate of decrease of the terms at the point of truncation. …
§2.11(iii) Exponentially-Improved Expansions
For illustration, we give re-expansions of the remainder terms in the expansions (2.7.8) arising in differential-equation theory. … Their extrapolation is based on assumed forms of remainder terms that may not always be appropriate for asymptotic expansions. …
6: 11.6 Asymptotic Expansions
§11.6(i) Large | z | , Fixed ν
If the series on the right-hand side of (11.6.1) is truncated after m ( 0 ) terms, then the remainder term R m ( z ) is O ( z ν - 2 m - 1 ) . … For re-expansions of the remainder terms in (11.6.1) and (11.6.2), see Dingle (1973, p. 445). …
7: 5.11 Asymptotic Expansions
If the sums in the expansions (5.11.1) and (5.11.2) are terminated at k = n - 1 ( k 0 ) and z is real and positive, then the remainder terms are bounded in magnitude by the first neglected terms and have the same sign. If z is complex, then the remainder terms are bounded in magnitude by sec 2 n ( 1 2 ph z ) for (5.11.1), and sec 2 n + 1 ( 1 2 ph z ) for (5.11.2), times the first neglected terms. … For the remainder term in (5.11.3) write … For re-expansions of the remainder terms in (5.11.1) and (5.11.3) in series of incomplete gamma functions with exponential improvement (§2.11(iii)) in the asymptotic expansions, see Berry (1991), Boyd (1994), and Paris and Kaminski (2001, §6.4). …
8: 8.22 Mathematical Applications
plays a fundamental role in re-expansions of remainder terms in asymptotic expansions, including exponentially-improved expansions and a smooth interpretation of the Stokes phenomenon. …
9: 3.3 Interpolation
§3.3(i) Lagrange Interpolation
3.3.33 c 7 = { 0.00106 , 0 < t < 1 , 0.00139 , - 1 < t < 0  or  1 < t < 2 , 0.00321 , - 2 < t < - 1  or  2 < t < 3 , 0.0158 , - 3 < t < - 2  or  3 < t < 4 .
10: 10.40 Asymptotic Expansions for Large Argument
Then the remainder term does not exceed the first neglected term in absolute value and has the same sign provided that max ( | ν | - 1 2 , 1 ) . … For higher re-expansions of the remainder term see Olde Daalhuis and Olver (1995a), Olde Daalhuis (1995, 1996), and Paris (2001a, b).